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Twitter asks federal court to dismiss lawsuit over mass layoffs

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Twitter has urged a California federal court to dismiss a suit lodged by former employees at the company who were affected by the recent massive layoffs. 

The social media giant asked the court to transfer the claims to Delaware which is where the conflicts over Musk's Twitter takeover will take place under the agreement terms.

Although Twitter has also said that these allocations should be thrown out of court.

READ MORE: ELON MUSK CONTINUES TO LAYOFF MORE TWITTER EMPLOYEES

It claims that the workers who filed the complaint have varied situations and have not clearly outlined what broad claims a big potential class of Twitter employees would have

One of the plaintiffs was already fired, while the others' termination dates at Twitter are in January and February 2023.

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Twitter's lawyers said that the workers made "vague, imprecise" claims about a collective group of Twitter employees they would like to represent.

READ MORE: ELON MUSK’S OBSESSION WITH TWITTER TOOK A TOLL ON TESLA SHARES

They also requested the court to reject their attempt to bring claims covering such a vast base of employees.

The company said: "Plaintiffs do not even attempt to define a class, making only passing reference to 'thousands of other Twitter employees,' or 'other similarly situated Twitter employees.”

The employees’ attorney Shannon Liss-Riordan said: "We will do everything necessary to protect the rights of Twitter employees.

"We call on Elon Musk to show some holiday spirit and honor the law and promises made to Twitter employees.

"If not, we are ready to take him on in 2023."

READ MORE: ELON MUSK WILL STEP DOWN AS TWITTER CEO AFTER FINDING A “FOOLISH ENOUGH” SUCCESSOR

Twitter's attorneys did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

A group of Twitter employees filed the case, claiming that the layoffs were unexpected and provided little severance.

They argue the move contradicted promises they’d received from the company's former leadership before Musk's takeover.

Employees stated they expected remote work mode for a year following the acquisition, but Musk ordered them to return to the office.

They said many are being offered just one month's severance, rather than two months or more, which was the standard normally given before Musk’s ownership.

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Twitter's lawyers told the court that the employees who filed the complaint had various concerns that had to be dealt with differently.

For example, one of them, Emmanuel Cornet, has been fired and claims he was removed without notice on November 1.

The other employees, who will be laid off over the next two months, have received the mandatory 60-day notice.

Twitter has also claimed that some of the staff in this group are bound by the arbitration and that their claims should be heard there.

Source: Insider

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